netturu

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a place i go to find interesting worth while stuff ,and post somethings of my own.
thisistheverge:

Rebooted ‘Hellraiser’ confirmed by writer Clive Barker
Horror icon Clive Barker is writing the script for a new Hellraiser movie. The English author and director took to Facebook to confirm that his pitch for a reboot of 1987’s original Hellraiser was successful and that the resulting film would be “darker and richer” than the first. 

thisistheverge:

Rebooted ‘Hellraiser’ confirmed by writer Clive Barker

Horror icon Clive Barker is writing the script for a new Hellraiser movie. The English author and director took to Facebook to confirm that his pitch for a reboot of 1987’s original Hellraiser was successful and that the resulting film would be “darker and richer” than the first. 

wired:

When insect taxonomist Chris Carlton of Louisiana State University went on a collecting trip in Belize, he did what many travelers do: He picked up a souvenir. It was even free, which was pretty sweet. After spending a month in Central America, he returned home and unwrapped his gift to himself.

Unfortunately, the unwrapping happened on the top of his noggin. Carlton’s scalp had become home to a human botfly larva, a spiny parasitic maggot that digs into living human flesh, feeds on the inflamed tissue surrounding it, and grows to more than an inch long.

“I began to notice a sort of discomfort exactly in the very top of my head,” Carlton told WIRED, recalling his horrifying experience in 1997, “and I didn’t think much of it.” He’d known about botflies, what with being an entomologist and all. But he didn’t draw the connection until an intense pain hit him every 15 to 20 minutes. That’s when he remembered that when the larvae reach a certain size, they “rotate in their little burrows in your skin, and this creates this sort of intense shooting periodic pain. So at that point the typical reaction is that you know you have a maggot in your body, and you must get it out.”
[MORE: Absurd Creature of the Week - Burrowing Botfly Grows Huge Feasting on Your Flesh]

wired:

When insect taxonomist Chris Carlton of Louisiana State University went on a collecting trip in Belize, he did what many travelers do: He picked up a souvenir. It was even free, which was pretty sweet. After spending a month in Central America, he returned home and unwrapped his gift to himself.

Unfortunately, the unwrapping happened on the top of his noggin. Carlton’s scalp had become home to a human botfly larva, a spiny parasitic maggot that digs into living human flesh, feeds on the inflamed tissue surrounding it, and grows to more than an inch long.

“I began to notice a sort of discomfort exactly in the very top of my head,” Carlton told WIRED, recalling his horrifying experience in 1997, “and I didn’t think much of it.” He’d known about botflies, what with being an entomologist and all. But he didn’t draw the connection until an intense pain hit him every 15 to 20 minutes. That’s when he remembered that when the larvae reach a certain size, they “rotate in their little burrows in your skin, and this creates this sort of intense shooting periodic pain. So at that point the typical reaction is that you know you have a maggot in your body, and you must get it out.”

[MORE: Absurd Creature of the Week - Burrowing Botfly Grows Huge Feasting on Your Flesh]

(Source: Wired)

thisistheverge:

Bright eyes, clean brains: sleep might scrub away gray matter waste
It’s long been known that sleep, much like eating or breathing, is a vital process for humans and animals. Insufficient shut-eye in people impairs cognition, curbs energy levels, and has been linked to a bevy of illnesses. But while scientists have explored myriad mechanisms that might explain why sleep is so critical, they’ve yet to come up with a firm answer. Now, new research offers yet another compelling theory: sleep allows our brains to clean themselves up. 

thisistheverge:

Bright eyes, clean brains: sleep might scrub away gray matter waste

It’s long been known that sleep, much like eating or breathing, is a vital process for humans and animals. Insufficient shut-eye in people impairs cognition, curbs energy levels, and has been linked to a bevy of illnesses. But while scientists have explored myriad mechanisms that might explain why sleep is so critical, they’ve yet to come up with a firm answer. Now, new research offers yet another compelling theory: sleep allows our brains to clean themselves up. 

Watching the human centipede 2 #offday

Watching the human centipede 2 #offday